nl

Enjoy clean water, give clean water

Learn about water

Water in Nepal


In the Netherlands and lots of other places, we can drink from the tap without thinking about it, but not everyone has this luxury.  In Nepal, one of the poorest countries in the world, 11% of the population doesn’t have access to safe and clean drinking water. And imagine 7 out of 10 of you friends not having access to sanitary facilities.* That is why through the Dopper Foundation, Dopper supports water projects set up by local contractors, with help of NGO Simavi and its local partners.

Water projects in Nepal

Dopper supports these water projects through the Dopper Foundation. 10% of Dopper sales goes to the foundation. The Dopper Foundation invests half of its proceeds in water projects in Nepal. The money goes to  local contractors, who install water pumps and safe sanitary facilities in Nepal. The education of the local villagers is also important. They must understand the importance of clean water and maintain the new systems themselves. Mothers are given extra attention, because they play a key role in the health of their families.


New project in Baglun
The Dopper Foundation is working with Simavi and its local partner NEWAH (Nepal Water for Health) on a large-scale water project in Baglun, Nepal, until 2016. 18,000 people will be given access to safe drinking water and 2,000 households will be provided with sanitary facilities.

Positive result in Makrahar
In 2010/2011, Dopper supported Simavi's "Makrahar" project in Nepal with € 35,205. The following year another € 45.231,- was added to this amount. This sum was invested in the installation of water pumps and sanitation systems and in education of the local population.

The counter on the top right of this page shows the amount of water pumps and toilets that are already installed thanks to donations by the Dopper Foundation. 

A water access point costs € 223 / $303

A lavatory costs € 53 / $72

 
 

*Source: World Health Statistics 2012, WHO and State of world population 2011, UNFPA